Lecture critique – Les médecins urgentistes sont-ils capables d’identifier les événements indésirables liés aux médicaments ?

Ana Luisa Van Innis

Ana Luisa Van Innis

Quality and Safety Officer – Paqs ASBL – Clos Chapelle-aux-Champs 30 – Bte 1.30.30 – 1200 Bruxelles – Belgique Autres articles de l'auteur dans Risques et qualité Articles dans PubMeb
Ana Luisa Van Innis

Lecture critique – Les médecins urgentistes sont-ils capables d’identifier les événements indésirables liés aux médicaments ?

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Résumé

Titre de l'article sujet de la Lecture critique Nizet P1, Tching-Sin M1, Dubreuil C1, Pinaud V2, Van Tricht M2, Navas D1, Huon JF1. Evaluation of the ability of emergency room doctors at a french university hospital center to identify adverse drug events. J Patient Saf. 2021 Jun 1;17(4):e355-e359. Doi : 10.1097/PTS.0000000000000650. 1-Pharmacie – Centre hospitalier universitaire (CHU) de Nantes – Nantes – France2-Service d’urgences – CHU de Nantes – Nantes – France


Objectives. Numerous adverse drug events (ADEs) are not identified by doctors in medical emergencies, and they are a barrier to optimal treatment of patients. Identification of the factors that influence awareness of ADEs by doctors could allow events that compromise patient safety to be avoided. The aims of this study were to quantify the recognition of ADEs by emergency room (ER) doctors and to identify the factors associated with the lack of identification of drug-related risks. Methods. This study was carried out at the ER of a French teaching hospital between January 1, 2014, and December 31, 2017. A previously used form was administered to the patients being treated in the ER, and it was completed using medical files to identify ADEs. The ADEs were then validated by a doctor and a senior pharmacist. Results. Of the 1 870 included patients, 279 (14.9%) exhibited an ADE. Of these 279 ADEs, 201 (72%) had been identified by the doctor. The probability of an ADE being identified was higher when the drug was directly linked with the main ailment of the patient (odds ratio, 1.72; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-2.97). Adverse drug events were identified less well when their severity was limited (spontaneous regression without treatment) (odds ratio, 0.5; 95% confidence interval, 0.27-0.93). Conclusions. This study showed that ADEs are identified less well when their severity is limited, as well as when the ADE is not directly linked with the main ailment of the patient.

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